Anderson Attorneys & Advisors

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2150 Manchester Road, Suite 101, Wheaton, IL 60187

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Wheaton traffic violations attorneyThe Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) is a state agency in charge of public roadways that are maintained by the state of Illinois. In addition, IDOT provides funding for rail, public, transit, and airport projects and administers fuel tax and federal funding to local jurisdictions in the state. Part of IDOT’s responsibilities include setting regulations for vehicles’ weights while they are traveling on the road. If a truck or commercial vehicle is too heavy, it can damage the highways and tollways as well as local roads and side streets. Under the Illinois Vehicle Code, there are instances where IDOT can issue special permits authorizing the operation of a vehicle or combination of vehicles that exceed the maximum weight normally allowed. For example, you may have noticed those “Oversize Load” signs on trucks or trailers that are moving a mobile home or massive construction equipment or parts. If a driver does not follow the requirements for overweight vehicles, he or she can be issued a traffic violation

Overweight Violations

When a driver is operating his or her vehicle under the authority of an oversize/ overweight permit issued by IDOT, there are specific actions that constitute a violation of the permit. These offenses can include the following: 

  • Incorrect license plate number or state

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Wheaton traffic violations lawyerThe Illinois Tollway is a user-fee system that does not receive state or federal funds to operate or maintain its roadways. I-PASS was implemented to avoid traffic delays by allowing motorists to seamlessly travel through the open road tolling lanes. This eliminates idling time, excessive braking, and the need to stop at toll plazas. The cost for each toll is also discounted for those who use an I-PASS, cutting the toll price in half. In addition, account alerts keep users up to date, alerting them if their credit cards on file are out of date or show low account balances. According to the Illinois State Toll Highway Authority, a person’s driver’s license may be suspended for failure to pay fines or penalties for five or more toll violations or evasions. However, starting July 1, that may no longer be the case. It is important to understand what actions or inactions can lead to a traffic violation if you are a frequent traveler on these Illinois roads. 

Penalties for Not Paying Tolls in Illinois

Motorists on any Illinois tollway are required to pay specified toll amounts at each toll plaza according to designated signs. Failure to pay the tolls may be considered a traffic violation, and it can result in costly fines and even a driver’s license suspension in some cases.

Drivers who miss paying a toll typically have a seven-day grace period to pay them online. Once a notice is received, motorists have 30 days to pay the fines or contest the violations. Penalties may include paying the amount in missed tolls plus an additional $20 per violation.

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DuPage County child abuse and neglect attorney

Illinois was one of the first states to establish child protection laws, mandating the reporting of child abuse and neglect, and it created one of the country’s first child abuse hotlines. The Illinois Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS) was established in 1964 as the nation’s first cabinet-level state child welfare agency. DCFS is responsible for protecting children through the investigation of suspected abuse or neglect by parents or caregivers who are in a position of trust or authority over a child. Located in Wheaton, Ill., the Children’s Center is part of the Dupage County Children’s Advocacy Center within the State’s Attorney Office. It is specifically for minors who are being interviewed based on reported child abuse or neglect. 

Investigating Reports of Child Abuse or Neglect

When authorities receive a report of potential child abuse or neglect, the initial response may lead to a criminal investigation. These investigations may involve the accused party or parties as well as the alleged victim. They may be conducted by child protective services employees, police officers, or a multidisciplinary team. The purpose of the investigation is to determine if a child has been harmed or is at risk of being harmed in the future. In addition, its goal is to reduce the danger and increase the safety of the child, while determining the need for services to support the child and the family. In some cases, someone can be wrongfully accused if the accusations are based on false information, evidence, or even mistaken identity. 

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DuPage County child abuse defense attorney

One of the main duties parents have is to protect their children from any harm or danger, such as abuse (physical, sexual, or emotional). This can also include neglect, which means not meeting a child’s basic needs, such as providing him or her with adequate food, housing, or medical care. Abuse can also include excessive corporal punishment or leaving a child alone at home, at a park, or in a vehicle. That is why certain people are required by law to immediately report any suspected abuse or neglect of a person under 18 years of age to the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS). Even if you are not a parent or legal guardian of a child, you still may be responsible for a child’s welfare if you are a caregiver for that child. 

What Is a Mandated Reporter?

While there are many Illinois laws regarding child protection and welfare, the most important one is the Abused and Neglected Child Reporting Act (ANCRA). Under this law, a wide array of professionals and other individuals are required to report suspected abuse or neglect if they witness it or have knowledge of it. A mandated reporter is a person who, as a result of his or her profession, is legally obligated to report any suspicion of child abuse or neglect to the authorities. These laws are in place to prevent children from being abused and to stop any further abuse or neglect as soon as possible.

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Wheaton, IL cannabis DUI defense attorneyThe state of Illinois passed several new laws that went into effect on January 1, 2020. One of these laws made it legal for Illinois citizens who are 21 or older to use recreational marijuana. However, there are certain restrictions that apply to the use and possession of cannabis, including limits on the amount of the drug a person can possess. If a person does not follow the law, he or she can face criminal charges. In addition to these concerns, cannabis users should be aware of the potential for arrests for driving while under the influence (DUI) of marijuana.  

Illinois DUI Laws

While a person may be charged with DUI if they operate a motor vehicle with a blood alcohol content (BAC) of .08 percent or higher, drivers can also face DUI charges if they are impaired due to marijuana use. In addition, people must transport the drug in a sealed container that is not accessible while the vehicle is in motion. 

If a police officer stops a motorist and suspects that he or she is under the influence of marijuana, the officer may administer field sobriety tests. If the driver fails or refuses these tests, he or she may be placed under arrest and taken to the local police station for chemical testing of blood or urine. If a driver who used marijuana has a THC level of 5 nanograms or more per milliliter of blood, or 10 nanograms per milliliter or higher of another bodily fluid, he or she can be charged with DUI.  Under certain circumstances, THC can remain in a person’s body for weeks or even months after use. This makes testing for a cannabis DUI complicated, since the drug does not pass through the body in the same way as alcohol, and there is no industry-accepted version of a breathalyzer for marijuana.  

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