Anderson Attorneys & Advisors

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2150 Manchester Road, Suite 101, Wheaton, IL 60187

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Wheaton criminal record expungement attorney

Any criminal act is taken seriously in the state of Illinois. Charges can impact an alleged offender’s personal and professional life, even if they are eventually dropped or dismissed altogether. In some cases, being arrested can go on a person’s criminal record, even if he or she is not convicted of the crime. This can occur if someone finds him or herself in the wrong place at the wrong time and is falsely accused. 

You may have heard the term “expungement” before, but what does it really mean in regard to someone’s criminal record? The state of Illinois offers eligible persons the chance to clear their criminal records and to receive the fresh start they deserve. 

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DuPage County ordinance violation defense lawyerMany people may have heard of different types of city violations, but they may not fully understand their meanings or consequences. An ordinance violation is a charge issued by local governments for violations of their municipal rules. In many cases, a person may unknowingly violate a rule because he or she did not even know the activity was illegal. It is important to note that this type of violation is typically processed in the local courts as opposed to the state circuit courts. This means it is not the same as a criminal charge; rather, it is typically civil rather than criminal in nature. However, these violations can still incur steep fines in addition to other consequences. 

Examples of Ordinance Violations

The United States criminal justice system contains various levels. For example, each state has its own set of criminal statutes, and federal laws apply throughout the country and override state laws. Cities, counties, villages, towns, and municipalities have the power to pass and enforce ordinances that apply to their own jurisdictions. It can often be difficult for a person to know what constitutes a violation since they may differ from town to town.

The following are some common examples of violations:

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Wheaton, IL traffic violation attorney gps cell phoneDistracted driving involves any activity that takes a motorist’s attention away from safely operating a vehicle. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), approximately 9 people are killed and more than 1,000 injured in crashes involving distracted drivers every day in the United States. However, many of today’s drivers rely on their smartphones as a navigation tool while traveling. Even if it is a place to which they go often, global positioning system (GPS) apps may be used by drivers to find the fastest route to their destination. Under a new Illinois law that went into effect on July 1, 2019, using an electronic device while driving can result in a traffic violation for the driver. Even if a motorist is simply holding a cell phone when behind the wheel, he or she can be stopped and issued a traffic ticket. 

New Illinois Moving Violation Law

Prior to the new law, if a driver was stopped for using a cellular phone or electronic device while driving, that was considered an “equipment violation.” This meant offenders did not risk suspension or revocation of their driver’s license by the Illinois Secretary of State. Under the old law, a warning was issued for a first offense, and subsequent tickets issued were non-moving violations.

Under the new law, all offenses involving driving while using an electronic device are considered moving violations. Three moving violations within a one-year period will result in driver’s license suspension for drivers 21 years and older. Drivers under 21 who receive two moving violations within a year will lose their license. The most common device is a cell phone, but the law also includes tablet computers and almost any mobile device with a screen. 

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DuPage County toll violation lawyer

The Illinois Tollway’s mission is to provide and promote a safe and efficient system of highways while ensuring the highest quality of service to motorists who use these roadways. The system includes the Tri-State Tollway (I-94/I-294/I-80), Jane Addams Memorial Tollway (I-90), Reagan Memorial Tollway (I-88), the Veterans Memorial Tollway (I-355), and the Illinois Route 390 Tollway. Drivers on any of these tollways are required to pay designated toll amounts at each toll plaza according to posted signs. Failure to pay the tolls can be considered a traffic violation, and it can result in hefty fines and even loss of driving privileges.  

What Is I-PASS?

I-PASS is a prepaid electronic toll collection system that allows for automatic payment of tolls. Designated “open road tolling” lanes eliminate the need to stop at toll plazas to pay the required toll. Users can register an account online and enter a credit card number to have the tolls automatically charged to the card. Drivers have an incentive to use an I-PASS, since they will only have to pay 50 percent of the regular toll amount when using this method. This can help traffic flow better by eliminating backups due to the need for drivers to stop to pay tolls in cash. For I-PASS holders who respond within 30 days of a violation, the Tollway may remove all the extra fines, so the driver will only pay the actual missed toll amount.  

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Wheaton, IL texting while driving defense attorney

It is common these days to see people using their cell phones while driving, including both talking and texting. However, this is a dangerous activity, and distracted driving has been shown to be a significant factor in car accidents that can cause serious or fatal injuries. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), cell phone use contributes to approximately a quarter of police-reported collisions in the United States. Under Illinois law, it is illegal to make a call on a hand-held phone, send a text message, or use any other form of electronic communication while operating a motor vehicle. Recent changes to that law could affect the penalties someone may face if pulled over for this moving violation

Distracted Driving 

Distracted driving refers to driving while doing any activities that take a driver’s attention and eyes away from the road. While the use of phones is one of the most common forms of distraction for drivers, technology has improved in recent years, enabling users to make phone calls without using their hands. In Illinois, hands-free devices and BlueTooth technology are permissible for drivers who are 19 years or older. However, even using hands-free devices can be distracting and endanger the driver, as well as other motorists and pedestrians on the road. If a text or voicemail notification sounds an alert on someone’s phone, this may cause the driver to look down. Even if a motorist takes his or her eyes off the road for a few seconds, an accident can happen that quickly.  

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